Three eggs

a fine pair 11th May

We can now confirm that the main nest pair have three eggs and the long process of incubating them has begun. White leg SS and his previous partner of 11 years had the whole egg and nest ‘set up’ managed like a well-oiled machine. They took turns to incubate and the female would get long breaks away from the nest, while SS took his duty of sitting, in her absence. The new Mrs SS could possibly be a first time breeder, she is unringed, so we do not know her history but her behaviour sometimes suggests that this is quite a new experience to her. Certainly, he is a new husband but she seemed to be a little slow to take up her duties in the beginning when the eggs were first laid. However, now she is into the swing of things, she is at times reluctant to leave at all. White leg SS would drop down from the perch into the nest and was there to take a turn but she didn’t budge at first. Over the past few days though, hunger and perhaps a need to take a stretch, has forced her to allow him some incubation time and they seem to be getting more familiar with their new routine.

We already know that SS is a super dad and has previously raised 10 broods safely through to adulthood and we hope that the new partner will prove to be a really good mum too. Even if she is inexperienced, she will soon learn how to look after her chicks when they finally hatch, which will be in mid-June.

Traffic stopper

On my way to the osprey centre, travelling along the A72 on Tuesday 12th May at just before 9am, traffic flow was interrupted by road works and a convoy system, involving a long wait to get going again. While sitting in the queue of traffic at a standstill, I got a fantastic view of an osprey fishing along the River Tweed right in front of the Cardrona Village Store. The osprey was being mobbed by a pair of crows and three common gulls but was determined to carry on fishing. It continued along the river towards Peebles and I was disappointed when the convoy started off and I had to drive on!

Oystercatcher island

The tiny island roundabout at Cardrona is home to the nesting oystercatchers again this year. On a small scrape of shingle in the island, the bird is sitting on eggs and her partner often sits on the road bollard like a little black and white sentry guarding his mate. The same crows that were giving the osprey a hard time, unfortunately seem to be watching the oystercatchers too. They did this last year and after a long term of incubation,  the eggs and birds where gone, nobody saw them hatch or leave and so we were never sure if they hatched and were led quickly to safety by mum and dad or were gobbled up by the waiting mobsters. Perhaps they were successful, seeing as they have chosen the same nest site again.

A pair of oystercatchers have been checking out the ground in front of the Wildwatch room at Glentress and looked like they were prospecting for a nest site too.
First spotted flycatchers

On 12th May the first spotted flycatcher was back at Kailzie Gardens and had taken up its old hunting ground along the main drive. It likes to perch on the fence posts along the drive, taking acrobatic leaps into the air and giving an aerial chase after flies and then returning to its perch.

Osprey FK8

The Tweed Valley satellite tagged female osprey is still in Portugal, around the Portimao region of the Algarve. Her movements are concentrated in the area around the River Arade and the reservoir to the north of the region.

Penina golf course roost

In early May, she ventured across further to the west to check out and roost overnight in a large Penina golfing resort. As the Portuguese summer progresses many of the smaller river tributaries dry up and the estuarine waters become hard saltpans so we may find that FK8 will move on again. We will have to wait and see what happens. A full round up of FK8’s latest movements will be posted soon.

Thanks for reading!

Diane

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s