Peaceful incubation

The long wait for the incubation period to come to an end seems tedious to us but for the resident ospreys at the main nest eyrie, life has become routine and fairly steady. If ospreys were thankful creatures I am sure that they would be grateful that they are not being harassed by other ospreys wanting a nest site. They seem to have been left to get on with their breeding season with little intrusion so far from other ospreys this year. Could this be because they are a new pairing and the female is strong and young, therefore presenting themselves as a force to be reckoned with? Do other ospreys intrude and cause bother only when they believe they are in with a chance to usurp a weaker individual? It is purely speculation but given that so many established pairs of long standing have had intruder birds and eggs kicked out of nests by rival males at other UK sites and the problems we had last year with our old female, it is a possible consideration.

Hatching time

There is not long to wait now for hatching time and we expect little osprey heads popping up in the nest sometime in the first week of June. This is an exciting time for the Tweed Valley Osprey Project to witness on screen the behaviour of the new mum with the very experienced older male. He has 11 years’ experience of being a successful father and rearing chicks to fledge. We are speculating that this is perhaps the females’ first brood.
Much of her time is spent preening her feathers while he is sitting on the eggs. The breeding season and the long wait for eggs to hatch is an opportunity to moult and grow some pristine new feathers.

A cheeky little female chaffinch took a wander across the top of the nest while the female osprey was incubating and she seemed to help herself to a bit of moss from the nest to take back to line her own nest presumably.

Blue tits

The blue tits on camera at Kailzie now seem to have a complete clutch of eggs at seven in the nest. This is less than most years and is also later than usual due to the cold delayed spring.

Return of the spotted flycatchers

We are delighted that spotted flycatchers have built a nest in the open fronted nest box with a camera on it. The last time they used this box was in 2007, we recently cleared some branches from the area in front of the box and it seems to have been just the right thing for the flycatchers. Flycatchers apparently like a completely clear flyway into their nest site because branches could become perches for predators to use to look into the nest.

Wild food at Kailzie

A Wild Food at Kailzie event will take place on Saturday 30th May from 11am to 4pm in the gardens, with a chance to discover what is edible and growing around us. There will be pond dipping to look at natural predators feeding in the ponds and song birds will be getting a treat as Lynn Walker will be building the Feasting Tree which we hope visitors will help to fill with delicious bird tucker. Come along and make some delicious pudding for birds to feast on and make a feeder of your own.

There will be children’s games and also some live bird ringing taking place in the osprey centre where there will be a chance to see songbirds close up before being fitted with a BTO ring and released unharmed. Donations collected on the day will be for the Tweed Valley Osprey Project.

On the move north

The satellite tagged osprey from Tweed Valley is on her travels again. Having spent what seems to have been an idyllic winter in Portimao in Portugal she briefly took a trip to Spain almost as far as the Strait of Gibraltar in March and then returned to her favourite haunts in Portugal where she has been settled ever since.

full journey of FK8 to May 11th 2015

However, with the onset of summer and the rising temperatures causing river and water levels in general to drop, the osprey, one year old female has begun to move in a northerly direction following the coastline of the Atlantic exploring water bodies in the form of reservoirs and the larger Portuguese rivers. She was last tracked at the Barragem de Morgavel near to the Rio Mira on 25th May.

Thanks for reading!

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3 thoughts on “Peaceful incubation

  1. joannadailey

    The Kielder male juvenile UV visited the Barragem de Morgavel several times during his stay in Portugal Sept-Dec 2014. An osprey was often reported there, possibly overwintering, so it seems a good spot for FK8.

    Reply

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