Best fed osprey

osprey one chick fed 21st june

The osprey chick being fed

It has been a tense week watching the Tweed Valley Osprey main nest camera, as with only one remaining chick we have been worried that the inexperienced new mum may not give the young developing bird the attention and care needed to see it through this vulnerable stage of its development. Thankfully, the advantage this little one has is that when dad brings a fish in, the meal no longer has to be shared with two other siblings and that has made mealtimes a gorging fest! I don’t think we have ever seen an osprey chick fed to the point where food is hanging out of its beak before now. Struggling to swallow the last bits because its belly was just full up!

This is good news because lots of rich protein packed, raw fish will ensure growth and as the chick matures the grey fluffy down will be gradually covered by weatherproof feathers and this will help to give some protection from the elements. The female bird did protect her youngster from a torrential downpour at the weekend which was another good sign that she is doing her job properly now. She will hopefully shield her youngster from the midday sun should we ever see it again, through the veil of grey clouds that have appeared this week.

Blue tits starve

Sadly, the little family of blue tits have all perished. The cold wet weather has persisted long enough to cause a distinct lack of caterpillars which are needed to raise a brood of blue tits. Seven hatched out and one by one they have died as they have not had enough food and even one of the pretty little adult birds has died in the nest, probably worn out from its efforts to find food.

Heronry news

22nd june 2015 heron

An adult heron at Kailzie

The empty heron nest at Kailzie has been receiving visits from one of the adult herons and the bird has been doing some nest tidying. They will hold the territory until it is time to breed again but they will not attempt a second brood this year. They nest colonially in a heronry and this is a small one which consists of only five nest sites on this site.

Volunteers, buzzards and goshawks

On Tuesday 17th June, some of the volunteers were treated to a visit to watch the buzzard chicks being ringed and some impressive goshawk chicks, deep in the Tweed Valley Forest.
Licensed bird ringers from Forestry Commission Scotland, Tony Lightley and Eve Schulte carried out the task and were able to show the enthusiastic volunteers from the Tweed Valley Osprey Project these truly wonderful birds. It was an emotional experience to engage with these wild creatures of the forest and a real privilege.

The buzzard chicks were really vocal and super raptors to observe at close quarters but they were totally overshadowed by the far superior and impressive goshawk. These chicks were large, feisty and very vocal with reflexes in their talons of lightning speed. Their sturdy thick legs made the buzzard legs seem like matchsticks by comparison.

buzzard chicks

The buzzard chicks

The familiar buzzard is seen regularly throughout the Borders and feeds on carrion, earthworms, rabbits, mice, voles and birds while the goshawk which looks almost identical to a sparrowhawk but is as big as a buzzard, is a secretive, stealthy hunter which glides silently through the forest and can wheel and flip vertically in fast flight, to negotiate branches when giving chase to prey such as a woodpigeon.

goshawk chicks

The goshawk chicks

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