Ready, Steady, Go!

Contented family life

The osprey family at the main nest seemed to be very relaxed and contented for most of the time this week. There is a very definite sense that the season is coming to an end. The young adult ospreys Tweedledum and Tweedledee are fully grown, and are ready to fledge at any time. Their proud parents have been seen sitting close together on the left hand perch above the nest. Looking like a two-headed osprey at one point, they were so close together, a scene we never would have believed possible with Mrs O, given how territorial she used to be. There is now a very close bond between the two adult birds, and SS is the accomplished dad once again, guiding his young offspring through the final stages before they spread their wings and fly.

ss and mrs o sitting close

Mrs O and SS sitting close together

Flight ready

flight ready

Getting ready to fly

The young birds have been wing flapping and catching up on lost time during the heat wave. In particular, Tweedledum, the male bird, seemed determined that he was going to take to the skies. His sister was slightly more reluctant. She vigorously flapped her wings and teetered on the edge of the nest, looking like she was determined to go, but her feet gave her away. She was clinging on to a big stick in the hopes that it would anchor her down until she was really ready.

Her more adventurous brother really got the whole flying activity figured out, making little practice flights from one side of the nest to the other, and short, open-winged jumps to and from the perches. Before he finally attempted to leave the nest, there was a lot of balancing on the edge and peering down to the ground. The two young birds watched the scene below them intently, building up the nerve to go, and perhaps realising for the first time just how high up their nest is.

Tweedledum its a long way down

Tweedledum loooks down

LL6 Tweedledee

Tweedledee sits on the edge

Feeding or flying

Feeding time has also been more relaxed. SS has been seen bringing fish to the nest and feeding both the young birds himself. Occasionally, feeding has ended abruptly for LL7 (Tweedledum), as he focused his attention on his wing-flapping practice instead, and left his food.

Fish must be in plentiful supply, as SS has also brought fish for Mrs O, which she shared with the young after taking the head for herself. The whole of the body of the fish was eaten by the young birds, with Tweedledee taking control of the meal before leaving a portion for her brother to finish.

Lift off for Tweedledum

Take off

Up, up and away

Finally, towards the end of the week, the serious business of flight dominated Tweedledum’s schedule, and eventually he plucked up the courage to go. His tracker showed that he left the nest at 6am on Sunday morning on 5 August. He was away, flying off above the forest and across to the edge of the plantation before coming to rest. He remained there for the rest of the day.

When volunteers came into the osprey centre on duty on Sunday they were concerned that there was no sign of him, especially when Dad brought fish back to the nest for Tweedledee and she fed herself. Perhaps the first flight was a bit daunting, and even hunger hadn’t convinced him to return to the nest until he was willing to try out his flight technique again. Those aerodynamic wings will give the bird great lift off and flight with little effort, but the tricky bit is learning to steer into landing sites, such as the nest or a tree top.

Meanwhile, back at the main nest without Tweedledum, the parents and his sister seemed unconcerned. This could have been because they knew where he was and could hear him calling close by.

No return

dad and daughter

SS and daughter Tweedledee waiting for Tweedledum to return

By Monday morning Tweedledum had still not returned to the nest site, and this was becoming worrying. His tracker had not updated and so he couldn’t be traced from his location at the edge of the forest. A quick search nearby was made, and three airborne ospreys were seen flying overhead. Knowing that Tweedledee was still in the nest, the conclusion was drawn that mum and dad were flying with their airborne son Tweedledum, and that thankfully all was well.

Right at the end of the day on Monday, Tweedledee also made her first flight, and a very brief visit back to the nest was made by Tweedledum. Since then, the young have stayed off the nest and only the parents were seen on there with a fish on Tuesday. Hopefully, they will use the nest for meal times, and we will be able to watch them for a while longer on the live camera before they leave us.

In memory of Robert

Sadly, one of our dear osprey volunteers Robert Jamieson has died. He was a great member of the volunteer team and loved the osprey project. He always gave his time so generously and made visitors to the centres welcome, telling them all the latest osprey news and updates. He will be greatly missed by all of us.

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